Organización para Estudios Tropicales, (OET), Costa Rica
Bibliografía Nacional en Biología Tropical, (BINABITROP)

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Signatura:Este es el resumen completo.
Autor: Tennant-De Alonso, L.E.
Dirección: Harvard University, Department of Organismic & Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, MA 02138-2902, US.
Título: Geographic variation and ecological determinants of the ant occupants of Conostegia setosa (Melastomataceae). Variación geográfica y determinantes ecológicos de las hormigas ocupantes de Conostegia setosa (Melastomataceae).
P.imprenta: v. 77, Suppl. 3, Part 2, p. 439. Año 1996.
Serie: Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America.
Descriptores: ANIMALS; INVERTEBRATES; ARTHROPODS; INSECTS; PLANTS; SPERMATOPHYTES; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; MAGNOLIOPSIDA.
HYMENOPTERA; FORMICIDAE; CONOSTEGIA SETOSA; PHEIDOLE MELASTOMAE; ANTS; GEOGRAPHICAL VARIATION; ECOLOGICAL DETERMINANTS; NESTING; FORAGING; COMPETITION; COLONIZATION; DOMATIA DEFENSE; ECOLOGY; MELASTOMATACEAE; PLANTS.
ECUADOR; COLOMBIA; SOUTH AMERICA; PANAMA; COSTA RICA; CENTRAL AMERICA.
Resumen: [Abstract only]. Ant occupants of the understory ant-plant Conostegia setosa (Melastomataceae) were surveyed at four sites in Central and South America. C. setosa plants in Ecuador, Colombia, and Panama were occupied mainly by Pheidole melastomae, a newly discovered obligate ant-plant inhabitant. Some plants at these locations were occupied by facultative ant species that also had other nesting sites. In contrast, plants in Costa Rica were occupied by 12 species of facultative ant occupants but no obligate occupant. Ecological factors that determine the ant occupants of C. setosa were studied in Panama and Costa Rica through surveys of ant species living in understory vegetation and observations of ants attracted to baits. The ant species that occupy C. setosa were more frequent and abundant at baits throughout the forest compared to other ant species encountered in this study. These species also nested and foraged more frequently in low vegetation, which likely gives them a higher probability of encountering C. setosa domatia. Furthermore, plant occupants were very competitive against other ant species at baits, an advantage when colonizing and defending plant domatia
Compiled by: Organization for Tropical Studies


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